The Path to Mobile Monetization

Many of the biggest Internet companies have spoken widely about mobile strategy and revenue. While these tech moguls reinforce that mobile is a valuable and growing space, they acknowledge there are growing pains as they work to monetize Internet entities in mobile — especially when it comes to advertising.

However, I’m continually pleased to hear executives from these companies use phrases like “not intrusive,” “adds value” and “enhances the experience” when outlining what they believe would make for a compelling mobile advertising experience.

As a matter of fact, this approach sounds a lot like what we have been saying for quite some time. And we know this user experience is achievable, since we pioneered and have been executing this type of advertising on mobile for years.

The vast majority of these companies are very smart, and they’re going to figure out the best ways to reach mobile users with advertising. However, it’s not that easy. Data shows that the advertising tactics that worked for the Web simply don’t translate to mobile. Mobile isn’t a miniaturized version of the Web; it’s an entirely new experience that is incredibly personal with its own method of engagement. Rather than scaling down Web solutions onto phones and tablets, we realized mobile is a unique medium that requires a unique solution.

To that end, we’ve seen what works when it comes to mobile advertising. Our perspective is that the mobile advertising experience should be built on three key pillars to achieve success with consumers:

  1. Choice. Users have told us that they don’t like to be surprised or bombarded with advertisements on mobile devices. With Tapjoy, we took a different approach to advertisements: in order to earn premium content, app users choose when they want to engage with advertisements, and then which advertising to engage with. We know consumers love this model: according to a recent Forrester study commissioned by Tapjoy, handing control to the consumer for their in-app advertisements can lead to higher attention levels and relevancy.
  2. Seamless experience. That same study revealed that consumers find the current approach of mobile ads annoying; in fact, survey respondents’ top request (at 68 percent) for future in- app advertising was for ads that do not interrupt app usage. This is critical context for mobile advertisers and platforms: know when to pick your spots and when to stay out of your user’s way.
  3. Engagement. Since consumers tailor mobile devices to suit personal interest with apps and content, ads too need to be engaging and directly targeted to suit the user’s interests. On mobile, it is paramount to provide consumers with ads that are relevant and add value.

As companies (advertising or otherwise) further integrate mobile into their strategy, it’s important they remember why mobile devices became so popular with consumers in the first place. If they keep those core principals in mind when approaching consumers, they’re much more likely to succeed.Many of the biggest Internet companies have spoken widely about mobile strategy and revenue. While these tech moguls reinforce that mobile is a valuable and growing space, they acknowledge there are growing pains as they work to monetize Internet entities in mobile — especially when it comes to advertising.

However, I’m continually pleased to hear executives from these companies use phrases like “not intrusive,” “adds value” and “enhances the experience” when outlining what they believe would make for a compelling mobile advertising experience.

As a matter of fact, this approach sounds a lot like what we have been saying for quite some time. And we know this user experience is achievable, since we pioneered and have been executing this type of advertising on mobile for years.

The vast majority of these companies are very smart, and they’re going to figure out the best ways to reach mobile users with advertising. However, it’s not that easy. Data shows that the advertising tactics that worked for the Web simply don’t translate to mobile. Mobile isn’t a miniaturized version of the Web; it’s an entirely new experience that is incredibly personal with its own method of engagement. Rather than scaling down Web solutions onto phones and tablets, we realized mobile is a unique medium that requires a unique solution.

To that end, we’ve seen what works when it comes to mobile advertising. Our perspective is that the mobile advertising experience should be built on three key pillars to achieve success with consumers:

  1. Choice. Users have told us that they don’t like to be surprised or bombarded with advertisements on mobile devices. With Tapjoy, we took a different approach to advertisements: in order to earn premium content, app users choose when they want to engage with advertisements, and then which advertising to engage with. We know consumers love this model: according to a recent Forrester study commissioned by Tapjoy, handing control to the consumer for their in-app advertisements can lead to higher attention levels and relevancy.
  2. Seamless experience. That same study revealed that consumers find the current approach of mobile ads annoying; in fact, survey respondents’ top request (at 68 percent) for future in- app advertising was for ads that do not interrupt app usage. This is critical context for mobile advertisers and platforms: know when to pick your spots and when to stay out of your user’s way.
  3. Engagement. Since consumers tailor mobile devices to suit personal interest with apps and content, ads too need to be engaging and directly targeted to suit the user’s interests. On mobile, it is paramount to provide consumers with ads that are relevant and add value.

As companies (advertising or otherwise) further integrate mobile into their strategy, it’s important they remember why mobile devices became so popular with consumers in the first place. If they keep those core principals in mind when approaching consumers, they’re much more likely to succeed.Many of the biggest Internet companies have spoken widely about mobile strategy and revenue. While these tech moguls reinforce that mobile is a valuable and growing space, they acknowledge there are growing pains as they work to monetize Internet entities in mobile — especially when it comes to advertising.

However, I’m continually pleased to hear executives from these companies use phrases like “not intrusive,” “adds value” and “enhances the experience” when outlining what they believe would make for a compelling mobile advertising experience.

As a matter of fact, this approach sounds a lot like what we have been saying for quite some time. And we know this user experience is achievable, since we pioneered and have been executing this type of advertising on mobile for years.

The vast majority of these companies are very smart, and they’re going to figure out the best ways to reach mobile users with advertising. However, it’s not that easy. Data shows that the advertising tactics that worked for the Web simply don’t translate to mobile. Mobile isn’t a miniaturized version of the Web; it’s an entirely new experience that is incredibly personal with its own method of engagement. Rather than scaling down Web solutions onto phones and tablets, we realized mobile is a unique medium that requires a unique solution.

To that end, we’ve seen what works when it comes to mobile advertising. Our perspective is that the mobile advertising experience should be built on three key pillars to achieve success with consumers:

  1. Choice. Users have told us that they don’t like to be surprised or bombarded with advertisements on mobile devices. With Tapjoy, we took a different approach to advertisements: in order to earn premium content, app users choose when they want to engage with advertisements, and then which advertising to engage with. We know consumers love this model: according to a recent Forrester study commissioned by Tapjoy, handing control to the consumer for their in-app advertisements can lead to higher attention levels and relevancy.
  2. Seamless experience. That same study revealed that consumers find the current approach of mobile ads annoying; in fact, survey respondents’ top request (at 68 percent) for future in- app advertising was for ads that do not interrupt app usage. This is critical context for mobile advertisers and platforms: know when to pick your spots and when to stay out of your user’s way.
  3. Engagement. Since consumers tailor mobile devices to suit personal interest with apps and content, ads too need to be engaging and directly targeted to suit the user’s interests. On mobile, it is paramount to provide consumers with ads that are relevant and add value.

As companies (advertising or otherwise) further integrate mobile into their strategy, it’s important they remember why mobile devices became so popular with consumers in the first place. If they keep those core principals in mind when approaching consumers, they’re much more likely to succeed.Many of the biggest Internet companies have spoken widely about mobile strategy and revenue. While these tech moguls reinforce that mobile is a valuable and growing space, they acknowledge there are growing pains as they work to monetize Internet entities in mobile — especially when it comes to advertising.

However, I’m continually pleased to hear executives from these companies use phrases like “not intrusive,” “adds value” and “enhances the experience” when outlining what they believe would make for a compelling mobile advertising experience.

As a matter of fact, this approach sounds a lot like what we have been saying for quite some time. And we know this user experience is achievable, since we pioneered and have been executing this type of advertising on mobile for years.

The vast majority of these companies are very smart, and they’re going to figure out the best ways to reach mobile users with advertising. However, it’s not that easy. Data shows that the advertising tactics that worked for the Web simply don’t translate to mobile. Mobile isn’t a miniaturized version of the Web; it’s an entirely new experience that is incredibly personal with its own method of engagement. Rather than scaling down Web solutions onto phones and tablets, we realized mobile is a unique medium that requires a unique solution.

To that end, we’ve seen what works when it comes to mobile advertising. Our perspective is that the mobile advertising experience should be built on three key pillars to achieve success with consumers:

  1. Choice. Users have told us that they don’t like to be surprised or bombarded with advertisements on mobile devices. With Tapjoy, we took a different approach to advertisements: in order to earn premium content, app users choose when they want to engage with advertisements, and then which advertising to engage with. We know consumers love this model: according to a recent Forrester study commissioned by Tapjoy, handing control to the consumer for their in-app advertisements can lead to higher attention levels and relevancy.
  2. Seamless experience. That same study revealed that consumers find the current approach of mobile ads annoying; in fact, survey respondents’ top request (at 68 percent) for future in- app advertising was for ads that do not interrupt app usage. This is critical context for mobile advertisers and platforms: know when to pick your spots and when to stay out of your user’s way.
  3. Engagement. Since consumers tailor mobile devices to suit personal interest with apps and content, ads too need to be engaging and directly targeted to suit the user’s interests. On mobile, it is paramount to provide consumers with ads that are relevant and add value.

As companies (advertising or otherwise) further integrate mobile into their strategy, it’s important they remember why mobile devices became so popular with consumers in the first place. If they keep those core principals in mind when approaching consumers, they’re much more likely to succeed.Many of the biggest Internet companies have spoken widely about mobile strategy and revenue. While these tech moguls reinforce that mobile is a valuable and growing space, they acknowledge there are growing pains as they work to monetize Internet entities in mobile — especially when it comes to advertising.

However, I’m continually pleased to hear executives from these companies use phrases like “not intrusive,” “adds value” and “enhances the experience” when outlining what they believe would make for a compelling mobile advertising experience.

As a matter of fact, this approach sounds a lot like what we have been saying for quite some time. And we know this user experience is achievable, since we pioneered and have been executing this type of advertising on mobile for years.

The vast majority of these companies are very smart, and they’re going to figure out the best ways to reach mobile users with advertising. However, it’s not that easy. Data shows that the advertising tactics that worked for the Web simply don’t translate to mobile. Mobile isn’t a miniaturized version of the Web; it’s an entirely new experience that is incredibly personal with its own method of engagement. Rather than scaling down Web solutions onto phones and tablets, we realized mobile is a unique medium that requires a unique solution.

To that end, we’ve seen what works when it comes to mobile advertising. Our perspective is that the mobile advertising experience should be built on three key pillars to achieve success with consumers:

  1. Choice. Users have told us that they don’t like to be surprised or bombarded with advertisements on mobile devices. With Tapjoy, we took a different approach to advertisements: in order to earn premium content, app users choose when they want to engage with advertisements, and then which advertising to engage with. We know consumers love this model: according to a recent Forrester study commissioned by Tapjoy, handing control to the consumer for their in-app advertisements can lead to higher attention levels and relevancy.
  2. Seamless experience. That same study revealed that consumers find the current approach of mobile ads annoying; in fact, survey respondents’ top request (at 68 percent) for future in- app advertising was for ads that do not interrupt app usage. This is critical context for mobile advertisers and platforms: know when to pick your spots and when to stay out of your user’s way.
  3. Engagement. Since consumers tailor mobile devices to suit personal interest with apps and content, ads too need to be engaging and directly targeted to suit the user’s interests. On mobile, it is paramount to provide consumers with ads that are relevant and add value.

As companies (advertising or otherwise) further integrate mobile into their strategy, it’s important they remember why mobile devices became so popular with consumers in the first place. If they keep those core principals in mind when approaching consumers, they’re much more likely to succeed.Many of the biggest Internet companies have spoken widely about mobile strategy and revenue. While these tech moguls reinforce that mobile is a valuable and growing space, they acknowledge there are growing pains as they work to monetize Internet entities in mobile — especially when it comes to advertising.

However, I’m continually pleased to hear executives from these companies use phrases like “not intrusive,” “adds value” and “enhances the experience” when outlining what they believe would make for a compelling mobile advertising experience.

As a matter of fact, this approach sounds a lot like what we have been saying for quite some time. And we know this user experience is achievable, since we pioneered and have been executing this type of advertising on mobile for years.

The vast majority of these companies are very smart, and they’re going to figure out the best ways to reach mobile users with advertising. However, it’s not that easy. Data shows that the advertising tactics that worked for the Web simply don’t translate to mobile. Mobile isn’t a miniaturized version of the Web; it’s an entirely new experience that is incredibly personal with its own method of engagement. Rather than scaling down Web solutions onto phones and tablets, we realized mobile is a unique medium that requires a unique solution.

To that end, we’ve seen what works when it comes to mobile advertising. Our perspective is that the mobile advertising experience should be built on three key pillars to achieve success with consumers:

  1. Choice. Users have told us that they don’t like to be surprised or bombarded with advertisements on mobile devices. With Tapjoy, we took a different approach to advertisements: in order to earn premium content, app users choose when they want to engage with advertisements, and then which advertising to engage with. We know consumers love this model: according to a recent Forrester study commissioned by Tapjoy, handing control to the consumer for their in-app advertisements can lead to higher attention levels and relevancy.
  2. Seamless experience. That same study revealed that consumers find the current approach of mobile ads annoying; in fact, survey respondents’ top request (at 68 percent) for future in- app advertising was for ads that do not interrupt app usage. This is critical context for mobile advertisers and platforms: know when to pick your spots and when to stay out of your user’s way.
  3. Engagement. Since consumers tailor mobile devices to suit personal interest with apps and content, ads too need to be engaging and directly targeted to suit the user’s interests. On mobile, it is paramount to provide consumers with ads that are relevant and add value.

As companies (advertising or otherwise) further integrate mobile into their strategy, it’s important they remember why mobile devices became so popular with consumers in the first place. If they keep those core principals in mind when approaching consumers, they’re much more likely to succeed.Many of the biggest Internet companies have spoken widely about mobile strategy and revenue. While these tech moguls reinforce that mobile is a valuable and growing space, they acknowledge there are growing pains as they work to monetize Internet entities in mobile — especially when it comes to advertising.

However, I’m continually pleased to hear executives from these companies use phrases like “not intrusive,” “adds value” and “enhances the experience” when outlining what they believe would make for a compelling mobile advertising experience.

As a matter of fact, this approach sounds a lot like what we have been saying for quite some time. And we know this user experience is achievable, since we pioneered and have been executing this type of advertising on mobile for years.

The vast majority of these companies are very smart, and they’re going to figure out the best ways to reach mobile users with advertising. However, it’s not that easy. Data shows that the advertising tactics that worked for the Web simply don’t translate to mobile. Mobile isn’t a miniaturized version of the Web; it’s an entirely new experience that is incredibly personal with its own method of engagement. Rather than scaling down Web solutions onto phones and tablets, we realized mobile is a unique medium that requires a unique solution.

To that end, we’ve seen what works when it comes to mobile advertising. Our perspective is that the mobile advertising experience should be built on three key pillars to achieve success with consumers:

  1. Choice. Users have told us that they don’t like to be surprised or bombarded with advertisements on mobile devices. With Tapjoy, we took a different approach to advertisements: in order to earn premium content, app users choose when they want to engage with advertisements, and then which advertising to engage with. We know consumers love this model: according to a recent Forrester study commissioned by Tapjoy, handing control to the consumer for their in-app advertisements can lead to higher attention levels and relevancy.
  2. Seamless experience. That same study revealed that consumers find the current approach of mobile ads annoying; in fact, survey respondents’ top request (at 68 percent) for future in- app advertising was for ads that do not interrupt app usage. This is critical context for mobile advertisers and platforms: know when to pick your spots and when to stay out of your user’s way.
  3. Engagement. Since consumers tailor mobile devices to suit personal interest with apps and content, ads too need to be engaging and directly targeted to suit the user’s interests. On mobile, it is paramount to provide consumers with ads that are relevant and add value.

As companies (advertising or otherwise) further integrate mobile into their strategy, it’s important they remember why mobile devices became so popular with consumers in the first place. If they keep those core principals in mind when approaching consumers, they’re much more likely to succeed.Many of the biggest Internet companies have spoken widely about mobile strategy and revenue. While these tech moguls reinforce that mobile is a valuable and growing space, they acknowledge there are growing pains as they work to monetize Internet entities in mobile — especially when it comes to advertising.

However, I’m continually pleased to hear executives from these companies use phrases like “not intrusive,” “adds value” and “enhances the experience” when outlining what they believe would make for a compelling mobile advertising experience.

As a matter of fact, this approach sounds a lot like what we have been saying for quite some time. And we know this user experience is achievable, since we pioneered and have been executing this type of advertising on mobile for years.

The vast majority of these companies are very smart, and they’re going to figure out the best ways to reach mobile users with advertising. However, it’s not that easy. Data shows that the advertising tactics that worked for the Web simply don’t translate to mobile. Mobile isn’t a miniaturized version of the Web; it’s an entirely new experience that is incredibly personal with its own method of engagement. Rather than scaling down Web solutions onto phones and tablets, we realized mobile is a unique medium that requires a unique solution.

To that end, we’ve seen what works when it comes to mobile advertising. Our perspective is that the mobile advertising experience should be built on three key pillars to achieve success with consumers:

  1. Choice. Users have told us that they don’t like to be surprised or bombarded with advertisements on mobile devices. With Tapjoy, we took a different approach to advertisements: in order to earn premium content, app users choose when they want to engage with advertisements, and then which advertising to engage with. We know consumers love this model: according to a recent Forrester study commissioned by Tapjoy, handing control to the consumer for their in-app advertisements can lead to higher attention levels and relevancy.
  2. Seamless experience. That same study revealed that consumers find the current approach of mobile ads annoying; in fact, survey respondents’ top request (at 68 percent) for future in- app advertising was for ads that do not interrupt app usage. This is critical context for mobile advertisers and platforms: know when to pick your spots and when to stay out of your user’s way.
  3. Engagement. Since consumers tailor mobile devices to suit personal interest with apps and content, ads too need to be engaging and directly targeted to suit the user’s interests. On mobile, it is paramount to provide consumers with ads that are relevant and add value.

As companies (advertising or otherwise) further integrate mobile into their strategy, it’s important they remember why mobile devices became so popular with consumers in the first place. If they keep those core principals in mind when approaching consumers, they’re much more likely to succeed.Many of the biggest Internet companies have spoken widely about mobile strategy and revenue. While these tech moguls reinforce that mobile is a valuable and growing space, they acknowledge there are growing pains as they work to monetize Internet entities in mobile — especially when it comes to advertising.

However, I’m continually pleased to hear executives from these companies use phrases like “not intrusive,” “adds value” and “enhances the experience” when outlining what they believe would make for a compelling mobile advertising experience.

As a matter of fact, this approach sounds a lot like what we have been saying for quite some time. And we know this user experience is achievable, since we pioneered and have been executing this type of advertising on mobile for years.

The vast majority of these companies are very smart, and they’re going to figure out the best ways to reach mobile users with advertising. However, it’s not that easy. Data shows that the advertising tactics that worked for the Web simply don’t translate to mobile. Mobile isn’t a miniaturized version of the Web; it’s an entirely new experience that is incredibly personal with its own method of engagement. Rather than scaling down Web solutions onto phones and tablets, we realized mobile is a unique medium that requires a unique solution.

To that end, we’ve seen what works when it comes to mobile advertising. Our perspective is that the mobile advertising experience should be built on three key pillars to achieve success with consumers:

  1. Choice. Users have told us that they don’t like to be surprised or bombarded with advertisements on mobile devices. With Tapjoy, we took a different approach to advertisements: in order to earn premium content, app users choose when they want to engage with advertisements, and then which advertising to engage with. We know consumers love this model: according to a recent Forrester study commissioned by Tapjoy, handing control to the consumer for their in-app advertisements can lead to higher attention levels and relevancy.
  2. Seamless experience. That same study revealed that consumers find the current approach of mobile ads annoying; in fact, survey respondents’ top request (at 68 percent) for future in- app advertising was for ads that do not interrupt app usage. This is critical context for mobile advertisers and platforms: know when to pick your spots and when to stay out of your user’s way.
  3. Engagement. Since consumers tailor mobile devices to suit personal interest with apps and content, ads too need to be engaging and directly targeted to suit the user’s interests. On mobile, it is paramount to provide consumers with ads that are relevant and add value.

As companies (advertising or otherwise) further integrate mobile into their strategy, it’s important they remember why mobile devices became so popular with consumers in the first place. If they keep those core principals in mind when approaching consumers, they’re much more likely to succeed.Many of the biggest Internet companies have spoken widely about mobile strategy and revenue. While these tech moguls reinforce that mobile is a valuable and growing space, they acknowledge there are growing pains as they work to monetize Internet entities in mobile — especially when it comes to advertising.

However, I’m continually pleased to hear executives from these companies use phrases like “not intrusive,” “adds value” and “enhances the experience” when outlining what they believe would make for a compelling mobile advertising experience.

As a matter of fact, this approach sounds a lot like what we have been saying for quite some time. And we know this user experience is achievable, since we pioneered and have been executing this type of advertising on mobile for years.

The vast majority of these companies are very smart, and they’re going to figure out the best ways to reach mobile users with advertising. However, it’s not that easy. Data shows that the advertising tactics that worked for the Web simply don’t translate to mobile. Mobile isn’t a miniaturized version of the Web; it’s an entirely new experience that is incredibly personal with its own method of engagement. Rather than scaling down Web solutions onto phones and tablets, we realized mobile is a unique medium that requires a unique solution.

To that end, we’ve seen what works when it comes to mobile advertising. Our perspective is that the mobile advertising experience should be built on three key pillars to achieve success with consumers:

  1. Choice. Users have told us that they don’t like to be surprised or bombarded with advertisements on mobile devices. With Tapjoy, we took a different approach to advertisements: in order to earn premium content, app users choose when they want to engage with advertisements, and then which advertising to engage with. We know consumers love this model: according to a recent Forrester study commissioned by Tapjoy, handing control to the consumer for their in-app advertisements can lead to higher attention levels and relevancy.
  2. Seamless experience. That same study revealed that consumers find the current approach of mobile ads annoying; in fact, survey respondents’ top request (at 68 percent) for future in- app advertising was for ads that do not interrupt app usage. This is critical context for mobile advertisers and platforms: know when to pick your spots and when to stay out of your user’s way.
  3. Engagement. Since consumers tailor mobile devices to suit personal interest with apps and content, ads too need to be engaging and directly targeted to suit the user’s interests. On mobile, it is paramount to provide consumers with ads that are relevant and add value.

As companies (advertising or otherwise) further integrate mobile into their strategy, it’s important they remember why mobile devices became so popular with consumers in the first place. If they keep those core principals in mind when approaching consumers, they’re much more likely to succeed.

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