The Need for Innovation in Mobile Advertising

Let’s face it — not everyone loves advertising. Lots of people say it’s interruptive or annoying and people debate its efficacy. But at least in “traditional media,” we have hundreds of years of history and decades of sophisticated research to settle any debate about how advertising works. And we even have events like the Super Bowl, an event that millions watch for the sole purpose of enjoying ads.

We’re not there yet in mobile advertising. It’s an industry that is still very much in its infancy. But despite its relative youth, with the growing ubiquity of smartphones and tablets, we are starting to see mobile advertising spending catch up to the time spent on mobile devices. Research firm eMarketer reported that mobile ad spending doubled in 2012 to $8.41 billion.

As the mobile ad market continues to grow, as the industry has done with more traditional ad mediums, we, as advertising thought leaders, need to continue to ask the market and ourselves what do advertisers want and what will consumers be comfortable with.

Most of the globe’s biggest companies employ forms of advertising: Tapjoy does the same thing within mobile apps that Google does when it displays ads next to search results. However, at a time when a lot of mobile advertising involves applying intrusive, web-based ad solutions to mobile, we’ve developed a different, and dare we say, disruptive approach. Tapjoy’s ad model lets consumers be in control — they select the ad with which they wish to engage, and then we reward them for their time and engagement.

It’s our view that consumers, who by some estimates are subjected to more than 5,000 ads per day, are keenly aware they are being marketed to. Why not let them choose what interests them and give them some upside for their engagement? It’s an innovative approach that others, like Hulu, have tried too. And while everyone is entitled to their opinion about disruptive models, most people agree that mobile advertising needs fresh approaches to engage busy consumers, and we believe we are taking a leadership role in moving the industry forward in an innovative way. Fast Company seemed to think our approach had a lot of merit.

But it’s not just Tapjoy and Fast Company that thinks this makes sense. As the results of a recent whitepaper we commissioned with Forrester show, we’re on the right track in figuring out what works in mobile advertising. Forrester’s study found that handing control to the consumer for their in-app advertisements can lead to higher attention levels and relevancy. Not surprisingly, respondents’ top request (68%) of future in-app advertising was they prefer ads that don’t interrupt their use of the app. And 59% of those surveyed said they want to be offered a reward in exchange for interacting with or watching an in-app ad.

Consumers love Tapjoy and the freemium business model because it’s a great way to acquire rewards and premium content without opening their wallets. But even though they love free, these consumers are being mischaracterized and maligned as they are not freeloaders. Smartphones users on Tapjoy’s network spend on average more than $200 per year on in-app payments, with tablet owners spending more than $300 per year. And it’s not a small group: Tapjoy’s monthly reach is around 339 million strong.

There will continue to be new approaches to mobile advertising and we routinely tell our partners to experiment and try different solutions — whether it’s Tapjoy or not. We’re committed to continuing to improve our model and the value we provide to consumers, developers and brands. There is so much more we can do to improve the experience, we’re hard at work on many of them and we’re excited about the huge potential ahead of the industry in 2013.

Most people expect mobile to be a hotbed of innovation. It’s our view that mobile advertising should live up to the challenge, too.

Posted by Peter Dille, CMO, Tapjoy

Let’s face it — not everyone loves advertising. Lots of people say it’s interruptive or annoying and people debate its efficacy. But at least in “traditional media,” we have hundreds of years of history and decades of sophisticated research to settle any debate about how advertising works. And we even have events like the Super Bowl, an event that millions watch for the sole purpose of enjoying ads.

We’re not there yet in mobile advertising. It’s an industry that is still very much in its infancy. But despite its relative youth, with the growing ubiquity of smartphones and tablets, we are starting to see mobile advertising spending catch up to the time spent on mobile devices. Research firm eMarketer reported that mobile ad spending doubled in 2012 to $8.41 billion.

As the mobile ad market continues to grow, as the industry has done with more traditional ad mediums, we, as advertising thought leaders, need to continue to ask the market and ourselves what do advertisers want and what will consumers be comfortable with.

Most of the globe’s biggest companies employ forms of advertising: Tapjoy does the same thing within mobile apps that Google does when it displays ads next to search results. However, at a time when a lot of mobile advertising involves applying intrusive, web-based ad solutions to mobile, we’ve developed a different, and dare we say, disruptive approach. Tapjoy’s ad model lets consumers be in control — they select the ad with which they wish to engage, and then we reward them for their time and engagement.

It’s our view that consumers, who by some estimates are subjected to more than 5,000 ads per day, are keenly aware they are being marketed to. Why not let them choose what interests them and give them some upside for their engagement? It’s an innovative approach that others, like Hulu, have tried too. And while everyone is entitled to their opinion about disruptive models, most people agree that mobile advertising needs fresh approaches to engage busy consumers, and we believe we are taking a leadership role in moving the industry forward in an innovative way. Fast Company seemed to think our approach had a lot of merit.

But it’s not just Tapjoy and Fast Company that thinks this makes sense. As the results of a recent whitepaper we commissioned with Forrester show, we’re on the right track in figuring out what works in mobile advertising. Forrester’s study found that handing control to the consumer for their in-app advertisements can lead to higher attention levels and relevancy. Not surprisingly, respondents’ top request (68%) of future in-app advertising was they prefer ads that don’t interrupt their use of the app. And 59% of those surveyed said they want to be offered a reward in exchange for interacting with or watching an in-app ad.

Consumers love Tapjoy and the freemium business model because it’s a great way to acquire rewards and premium content without opening their wallets. But even though they love free, these consumers are being mischaracterized and maligned as they are not freeloaders. Smartphones users on Tapjoy’s network spend on average more than $200 per year on in-app payments, with tablet owners spending more than $300 per year. And it’s not a small group: Tapjoy’s monthly reach is around 339 million strong.

There will continue to be new approaches to mobile advertising and we routinely tell our partners to experiment and try different solutions — whether it’s Tapjoy or not. We’re committed to continuing to improve our model and the value we provide to consumers, developers and brands. There is so much more we can do to improve the experience, we’re hard at work on many of them and we’re excited about the huge potential ahead of the industry in 2013.

Most people expect mobile to be a hotbed of innovation. It’s our view that mobile advertising should live up to the challenge, too.

Posted by Peter Dille, CMO, Tapjoy

Let’s face it — not everyone loves advertising. Lots of people say it’s interruptive or annoying and people debate its efficacy. But at least in “traditional media,” we have hundreds of years of history and decades of sophisticated research to settle any debate about how advertising works. And we even have events like the Super Bowl, an event that millions watch for the sole purpose of enjoying ads.

We’re not there yet in mobile advertising. It’s an industry that is still very much in its infancy. But despite its relative youth, with the growing ubiquity of smartphones and tablets, we are starting to see mobile advertising spending catch up to the time spent on mobile devices. Research firm eMarketer reported that mobile ad spending doubled in 2012 to $8.41 billion.

As the mobile ad market continues to grow, as the industry has done with more traditional ad mediums, we, as advertising thought leaders, need to continue to ask the market and ourselves what do advertisers want and what will consumers be comfortable with.

Most of the globe’s biggest companies employ forms of advertising: Tapjoy does the same thing within mobile apps that Google does when it displays ads next to search results. However, at a time when a lot of mobile advertising involves applying intrusive, web-based ad solutions to mobile, we’ve developed a different, and dare we say, disruptive approach. Tapjoy’s ad model lets consumers be in control — they select the ad with which they wish to engage, and then we reward them for their time and engagement.

It’s our view that consumers, who by some estimates are subjected to more than 5,000 ads per day, are keenly aware they are being marketed to. Why not let them choose what interests them and give them some upside for their engagement? It’s an innovative approach that others, like Hulu, have tried too. And while everyone is entitled to their opinion about disruptive models, most people agree that mobile advertising needs fresh approaches to engage busy consumers, and we believe we are taking a leadership role in moving the industry forward in an innovative way. Fast Company seemed to think our approach had a lot of merit.

But it’s not just Tapjoy and Fast Company that thinks this makes sense. As the results of a recent whitepaper we commissioned with Forrester show, we’re on the right track in figuring out what works in mobile advertising. Forrester’s study found that handing control to the consumer for their in-app advertisements can lead to higher attention levels and relevancy. Not surprisingly, respondents’ top request (68%) of future in-app advertising was they prefer ads that don’t interrupt their use of the app. And 59% of those surveyed said they want to be offered a reward in exchange for interacting with or watching an in-app ad.

Consumers love Tapjoy and the freemium business model because it’s a great way to acquire rewards and premium content without opening their wallets. But even though they love free, these consumers are being mischaracterized and maligned as they are not freeloaders. Smartphones users on Tapjoy’s network spend on average more than $200 per year on in-app payments, with tablet owners spending more than $300 per year. And it’s not a small group: Tapjoy’s monthly reach is around 339 million strong.

There will continue to be new approaches to mobile advertising and we routinely tell our partners to experiment and try different solutions — whether it’s Tapjoy or not. We’re committed to continuing to improve our model and the value we provide to consumers, developers and brands. There is so much more we can do to improve the experience, we’re hard at work on many of them and we’re excited about the huge potential ahead of the industry in 2013.

Most people expect mobile to be a hotbed of innovation. It’s our view that mobile advertising should live up to the challenge, too.

Posted by Peter Dille, CMO, Tapjoy

Let’s face it — not everyone loves advertising. Lots of people say it’s interruptive or annoying and people debate its efficacy. But at least in “traditional media,” we have hundreds of years of history and decades of sophisticated research to settle any debate about how advertising works. And we even have events like the Super Bowl, an event that millions watch for the sole purpose of enjoying ads.

We’re not there yet in mobile advertising. It’s an industry that is still very much in its infancy. But despite its relative youth, with the growing ubiquity of smartphones and tablets, we are starting to see mobile advertising spending catch up to the time spent on mobile devices. Research firm eMarketer reported that mobile ad spending doubled in 2012 to $8.41 billion.

As the mobile ad market continues to grow, as the industry has done with more traditional ad mediums, we, as advertising thought leaders, need to continue to ask the market and ourselves what do advertisers want and what will consumers be comfortable with.

Most of the globe’s biggest companies employ forms of advertising: Tapjoy does the same thing within mobile apps that Google does when it displays ads next to search results. However, at a time when a lot of mobile advertising involves applying intrusive, web-based ad solutions to mobile, we’ve developed a different, and dare we say, disruptive approach. Tapjoy’s ad model lets consumers be in control — they select the ad with which they wish to engage, and then we reward them for their time and engagement.

It’s our view that consumers, who by some estimates are subjected to more than 5,000 ads per day, are keenly aware they are being marketed to. Why not let them choose what interests them and give them some upside for their engagement? It’s an innovative approach that others, like Hulu, have tried too. And while everyone is entitled to their opinion about disruptive models, most people agree that mobile advertising needs fresh approaches to engage busy consumers, and we believe we are taking a leadership role in moving the industry forward in an innovative way. Fast Company seemed to think our approach had a lot of merit.

But it’s not just Tapjoy and Fast Company that thinks this makes sense. As the results of a recent whitepaper we commissioned with Forrester show, we’re on the right track in figuring out what works in mobile advertising. Forrester’s study found that handing control to the consumer for their in-app advertisements can lead to higher attention levels and relevancy. Not surprisingly, respondents’ top request (68%) of future in-app advertising was they prefer ads that don’t interrupt their use of the app. And 59% of those surveyed said they want to be offered a reward in exchange for interacting with or watching an in-app ad.

Consumers love Tapjoy and the freemium business model because it’s a great way to acquire rewards and premium content without opening their wallets. But even though they love free, these consumers are being mischaracterized and maligned as they are not freeloaders. Smartphones users on Tapjoy’s network spend on average more than $200 per year on in-app payments, with tablet owners spending more than $300 per year. And it’s not a small group: Tapjoy’s monthly reach is around 339 million strong.

There will continue to be new approaches to mobile advertising and we routinely tell our partners to experiment and try different solutions — whether it’s Tapjoy or not. We’re committed to continuing to improve our model and the value we provide to consumers, developers and brands. There is so much more we can do to improve the experience, we’re hard at work on many of them and we’re excited about the huge potential ahead of the industry in 2013.

Most people expect mobile to be a hotbed of innovation. It’s our view that mobile advertising should live up to the challenge, too.

Posted by Peter Dille, CMO, Tapjoy

Let’s face it — not everyone loves advertising. Lots of people say it’s interruptive or annoying and people debate its efficacy. But at least in “traditional media,” we have hundreds of years of history and decades of sophisticated research to settle any debate about how advertising works. And we even have events like the Super Bowl, an event that millions watch for the sole purpose of enjoying ads.

We’re not there yet in mobile advertising. It’s an industry that is still very much in its infancy. But despite its relative youth, with the growing ubiquity of smartphones and tablets, we are starting to see mobile advertising spending catch up to the time spent on mobile devices. Research firm eMarketer reported that mobile ad spending doubled in 2012 to $8.41 billion.

As the mobile ad market continues to grow, as the industry has done with more traditional ad mediums, we, as advertising thought leaders, need to continue to ask the market and ourselves what do advertisers want and what will consumers be comfortable with.

Most of the globe’s biggest companies employ forms of advertising: Tapjoy does the same thing within mobile apps that Google does when it displays ads next to search results. However, at a time when a lot of mobile advertising involves applying intrusive, web-based ad solutions to mobile, we’ve developed a different, and dare we say, disruptive approach. Tapjoy’s ad model lets consumers be in control — they select the ad with which they wish to engage, and then we reward them for their time and engagement.

It’s our view that consumers, who by some estimates are subjected to more than 5,000 ads per day, are keenly aware they are being marketed to. Why not let them choose what interests them and give them some upside for their engagement? It’s an innovative approach that others, like Hulu, have tried too. And while everyone is entitled to their opinion about disruptive models, most people agree that mobile advertising needs fresh approaches to engage busy consumers, and we believe we are taking a leadership role in moving the industry forward in an innovative way. Fast Company seemed to think our approach had a lot of merit.

But it’s not just Tapjoy and Fast Company that thinks this makes sense. As the results of a recent whitepaper we commissioned with Forrester show, we’re on the right track in figuring out what works in mobile advertising. Forrester’s study found that handing control to the consumer for their in-app advertisements can lead to higher attention levels and relevancy. Not surprisingly, respondents’ top request (68%) of future in-app advertising was they prefer ads that don’t interrupt their use of the app. And 59% of those surveyed said they want to be offered a reward in exchange for interacting with or watching an in-app ad.

Consumers love Tapjoy and the freemium business model because it’s a great way to acquire rewards and premium content without opening their wallets. But even though they love free, these consumers are being mischaracterized and maligned as they are not freeloaders. Smartphones users on Tapjoy’s network spend on average more than $200 per year on in-app payments, with tablet owners spending more than $300 per year. And it’s not a small group: Tapjoy’s monthly reach is around 339 million strong.

There will continue to be new approaches to mobile advertising and we routinely tell our partners to experiment and try different solutions — whether it’s Tapjoy or not. We’re committed to continuing to improve our model and the value we provide to consumers, developers and brands. There is so much more we can do to improve the experience, we’re hard at work on many of them and we’re excited about the huge potential ahead of the industry in 2013.

Most people expect mobile to be a hotbed of innovation. It’s our view that mobile advertising should live up to the challenge, too.

Posted by Peter Dille, CMO, Tapjoy

Let’s face it — not everyone loves advertising. Lots of people say it’s interruptive or annoying and people debate its efficacy. But at least in “traditional media,” we have hundreds of years of history and decades of sophisticated research to settle any debate about how advertising works. And we even have events like the Super Bowl, an event that millions watch for the sole purpose of enjoying ads.

We’re not there yet in mobile advertising. It’s an industry that is still very much in its infancy. But despite its relative youth, with the growing ubiquity of smartphones and tablets, we are starting to see mobile advertising spending catch up to the time spent on mobile devices. Research firm eMarketer reported that mobile ad spending doubled in 2012 to $8.41 billion.

As the mobile ad market continues to grow, as the industry has done with more traditional ad mediums, we, as advertising thought leaders, need to continue to ask the market and ourselves what do advertisers want and what will consumers be comfortable with.

Most of the globe’s biggest companies employ forms of advertising: Tapjoy does the same thing within mobile apps that Google does when it displays ads next to search results. However, at a time when a lot of mobile advertising involves applying intrusive, web-based ad solutions to mobile, we’ve developed a different, and dare we say, disruptive approach. Tapjoy’s ad model lets consumers be in control — they select the ad with which they wish to engage, and then we reward them for their time and engagement.

It’s our view that consumers, who by some estimates are subjected to more than 5,000 ads per day, are keenly aware they are being marketed to. Why not let them choose what interests them and give them some upside for their engagement? It’s an innovative approach that others, like Hulu, have tried too. And while everyone is entitled to their opinion about disruptive models, most people agree that mobile advertising needs fresh approaches to engage busy consumers, and we believe we are taking a leadership role in moving the industry forward in an innovative way. Fast Company seemed to think our approach had a lot of merit.

But it’s not just Tapjoy and Fast Company that thinks this makes sense. As the results of a recent whitepaper we commissioned with Forrester show, we’re on the right track in figuring out what works in mobile advertising. Forrester’s study found that handing control to the consumer for their in-app advertisements can lead to higher attention levels and relevancy. Not surprisingly, respondents’ top request (68%) of future in-app advertising was they prefer ads that don’t interrupt their use of the app. And 59% of those surveyed said they want to be offered a reward in exchange for interacting with or watching an in-app ad.

Consumers love Tapjoy and the freemium business model because it’s a great way to acquire rewards and premium content without opening their wallets. But even though they love free, these consumers are being mischaracterized and maligned as they are not freeloaders. Smartphones users on Tapjoy’s network spend on average more than $200 per year on in-app payments, with tablet owners spending more than $300 per year. And it’s not a small group: Tapjoy’s monthly reach is around 339 million strong.

There will continue to be new approaches to mobile advertising and we routinely tell our partners to experiment and try different solutions — whether it’s Tapjoy or not. We’re committed to continuing to improve our model and the value we provide to consumers, developers and brands. There is so much more we can do to improve the experience, we’re hard at work on many of them and we’re excited about the huge potential ahead of the industry in 2013.

Most people expect mobile to be a hotbed of innovation. It’s our view that mobile advertising should live up to the challenge, too.

Posted by Peter Dille, CMO, Tapjoy

Let’s face it — not everyone loves advertising. Lots of people say it’s interruptive or annoying and people debate its efficacy. But at least in “traditional media,” we have hundreds of years of history and decades of sophisticated research to settle any debate about how advertising works. And we even have events like the Super Bowl, an event that millions watch for the sole purpose of enjoying ads.

We’re not there yet in mobile advertising. It’s an industry that is still very much in its infancy. But despite its relative youth, with the growing ubiquity of smartphones and tablets, we are starting to see mobile advertising spending catch up to the time spent on mobile devices. Research firm eMarketer reported that mobile ad spending doubled in 2012 to $8.41 billion.

As the mobile ad market continues to grow, as the industry has done with more traditional ad mediums, we, as advertising thought leaders, need to continue to ask the market and ourselves what do advertisers want and what will consumers be comfortable with.

Most of the globe’s biggest companies employ forms of advertising: Tapjoy does the same thing within mobile apps that Google does when it displays ads next to search results. However, at a time when a lot of mobile advertising involves applying intrusive, web-based ad solutions to mobile, we’ve developed a different, and dare we say, disruptive approach. Tapjoy’s ad model lets consumers be in control — they select the ad with which they wish to engage, and then we reward them for their time and engagement.

It’s our view that consumers, who by some estimates are subjected to more than 5,000 ads per day, are keenly aware they are being marketed to. Why not let them choose what interests them and give them some upside for their engagement? It’s an innovative approach that others, like Hulu, have tried too. And while everyone is entitled to their opinion about disruptive models, most people agree that mobile advertising needs fresh approaches to engage busy consumers, and we believe we are taking a leadership role in moving the industry forward in an innovative way. Fast Company seemed to think our approach had a lot of merit.

But it’s not just Tapjoy and Fast Company that thinks this makes sense. As the results of a recent whitepaper we commissioned with Forrester show, we’re on the right track in figuring out what works in mobile advertising. Forrester’s study found that handing control to the consumer for their in-app advertisements can lead to higher attention levels and relevancy. Not surprisingly, respondents’ top request (68%) of future in-app advertising was they prefer ads that don’t interrupt their use of the app. And 59% of those surveyed said they want to be offered a reward in exchange for interacting with or watching an in-app ad.

Consumers love Tapjoy and the freemium business model because it’s a great way to acquire rewards and premium content without opening their wallets. But even though they love free, these consumers are being mischaracterized and maligned as they are not freeloaders. Smartphones users on Tapjoy’s network spend on average more than $200 per year on in-app payments, with tablet owners spending more than $300 per year. And it’s not a small group: Tapjoy’s monthly reach is around 339 million strong.

There will continue to be new approaches to mobile advertising and we routinely tell our partners to experiment and try different solutions — whether it’s Tapjoy or not. We’re committed to continuing to improve our model and the value we provide to consumers, developers and brands. There is so much more we can do to improve the experience, we’re hard at work on many of them and we’re excited about the huge potential ahead of the industry in 2013.

Most people expect mobile to be a hotbed of innovation. It’s our view that mobile advertising should live up to the challenge, too.

Posted by Peter Dille, CMO, Tapjoy

Let’s face it — not everyone loves advertising. Lots of people say it’s interruptive or annoying and people debate its efficacy. But at least in “traditional media,” we have hundreds of years of history and decades of sophisticated research to settle any debate about how advertising works. And we even have events like the Super Bowl, an event that millions watch for the sole purpose of enjoying ads.

We’re not there yet in mobile advertising. It’s an industry that is still very much in its infancy. But despite its relative youth, with the growing ubiquity of smartphones and tablets, we are starting to see mobile advertising spending catch up to the time spent on mobile devices. Research firm eMarketer reported that mobile ad spending doubled in 2012 to $8.41 billion.

As the mobile ad market continues to grow, as the industry has done with more traditional ad mediums, we, as advertising thought leaders, need to continue to ask the market and ourselves what do advertisers want and what will consumers be comfortable with.

Most of the globe’s biggest companies employ forms of advertising: Tapjoy does the same thing within mobile apps that Google does when it displays ads next to search results. However, at a time when a lot of mobile advertising involves applying intrusive, web-based ad solutions to mobile, we’ve developed a different, and dare we say, disruptive approach. Tapjoy’s ad model lets consumers be in control — they select the ad with which they wish to engage, and then we reward them for their time and engagement.

It’s our view that consumers, who by some estimates are subjected to more than 5,000 ads per day, are keenly aware they are being marketed to. Why not let them choose what interests them and give them some upside for their engagement? It’s an innovative approach that others, like Hulu, have tried too. And while everyone is entitled to their opinion about disruptive models, most people agree that mobile advertising needs fresh approaches to engage busy consumers, and we believe we are taking a leadership role in moving the industry forward in an innovative way. Fast Company seemed to think our approach had a lot of merit.

But it’s not just Tapjoy and Fast Company that thinks this makes sense. As the results of a recent whitepaper we commissioned with Forrester show, we’re on the right track in figuring out what works in mobile advertising. Forrester’s study found that handing control to the consumer for their in-app advertisements can lead to higher attention levels and relevancy. Not surprisingly, respondents’ top request (68%) of future in-app advertising was they prefer ads that don’t interrupt their use of the app. And 59% of those surveyed said they want to be offered a reward in exchange for interacting with or watching an in-app ad.

Consumers love Tapjoy and the freemium business model because it’s a great way to acquire rewards and premium content without opening their wallets. But even though they love free, these consumers are being mischaracterized and maligned as they are not freeloaders. Smartphones users on Tapjoy’s network spend on average more than $200 per year on in-app payments, with tablet owners spending more than $300 per year. And it’s not a small group: Tapjoy’s monthly reach is around 339 million strong.

There will continue to be new approaches to mobile advertising and we routinely tell our partners to experiment and try different solutions — whether it’s Tapjoy or not. We’re committed to continuing to improve our model and the value we provide to consumers, developers and brands. There is so much more we can do to improve the experience, we’re hard at work on many of them and we’re excited about the huge potential ahead of the industry in 2013.

Most people expect mobile to be a hotbed of innovation. It’s our view that mobile advertising should live up to the challenge, too.

Posted by Peter Dille, CMO, Tapjoy

Let’s face it — not everyone loves advertising. Lots of people say it’s interruptive or annoying and people debate its efficacy. But at least in “traditional media,” we have hundreds of years of history and decades of sophisticated research to settle any debate about how advertising works. And we even have events like the Super Bowl, an event that millions watch for the sole purpose of enjoying ads.

We’re not there yet in mobile advertising. It’s an industry that is still very much in its infancy. But despite its relative youth, with the growing ubiquity of smartphones and tablets, we are starting to see mobile advertising spending catch up to the time spent on mobile devices. Research firm eMarketer reported that mobile ad spending doubled in 2012 to $8.41 billion.

As the mobile ad market continues to grow, as the industry has done with more traditional ad mediums, we, as advertising thought leaders, need to continue to ask the market and ourselves what do advertisers want and what will consumers be comfortable with.

Most of the globe’s biggest companies employ forms of advertising: Tapjoy does the same thing within mobile apps that Google does when it displays ads next to search results. However, at a time when a lot of mobile advertising involves applying intrusive, web-based ad solutions to mobile, we’ve developed a different, and dare we say, disruptive approach. Tapjoy’s ad model lets consumers be in control — they select the ad with which they wish to engage, and then we reward them for their time and engagement.

It’s our view that consumers, who by some estimates are subjected to more than 5,000 ads per day, are keenly aware they are being marketed to. Why not let them choose what interests them and give them some upside for their engagement? It’s an innovative approach that others, like Hulu, have tried too. And while everyone is entitled to their opinion about disruptive models, most people agree that mobile advertising needs fresh approaches to engage busy consumers, and we believe we are taking a leadership role in moving the industry forward in an innovative way. Fast Company seemed to think our approach had a lot of merit.

But it’s not just Tapjoy and Fast Company that thinks this makes sense. As the results of a recent whitepaper we commissioned with Forrester show, we’re on the right track in figuring out what works in mobile advertising. Forrester’s study found that handing control to the consumer for their in-app advertisements can lead to higher attention levels and relevancy. Not surprisingly, respondents’ top request (68%) of future in-app advertising was they prefer ads that don’t interrupt their use of the app. And 59% of those surveyed said they want to be offered a reward in exchange for interacting with or watching an in-app ad.

Consumers love Tapjoy and the freemium business model because it’s a great way to acquire rewards and premium content without opening their wallets. But even though they love free, these consumers are being mischaracterized and maligned as they are not freeloaders. Smartphones users on Tapjoy’s network spend on average more than $200 per year on in-app payments, with tablet owners spending more than $300 per year. And it’s not a small group: Tapjoy’s monthly reach is around 339 million strong.

There will continue to be new approaches to mobile advertising and we routinely tell our partners to experiment and try different solutions — whether it’s Tapjoy or not. We’re committed to continuing to improve our model and the value we provide to consumers, developers and brands. There is so much more we can do to improve the experience, we’re hard at work on many of them and we’re excited about the huge potential ahead of the industry in 2013.

Most people expect mobile to be a hotbed of innovation. It’s our view that mobile advertising should live up to the challenge, too.

Posted by Peter Dille, CMO, Tapjoy

Let’s face it — not everyone loves advertising. Lots of people say it’s interruptive or annoying and people debate its efficacy. But at least in “traditional media,” we have hundreds of years of history and decades of sophisticated research to settle any debate about how advertising works. And we even have events like the Super Bowl, an event that millions watch for the sole purpose of enjoying ads.

We’re not there yet in mobile advertising. It’s an industry that is still very much in its infancy. But despite its relative youth, with the growing ubiquity of smartphones and tablets, we are starting to see mobile advertising spending catch up to the time spent on mobile devices. Research firm eMarketer reported that mobile ad spending doubled in 2012 to $8.41 billion.

As the mobile ad market continues to grow, as the industry has done with more traditional ad mediums, we, as advertising thought leaders, need to continue to ask the market and ourselves what do advertisers want and what will consumers be comfortable with.

Most of the globe’s biggest companies employ forms of advertising: Tapjoy does the same thing within mobile apps that Google does when it displays ads next to search results. However, at a time when a lot of mobile advertising involves applying intrusive, web-based ad solutions to mobile, we’ve developed a different, and dare we say, disruptive approach. Tapjoy’s ad model lets consumers be in control — they select the ad with which they wish to engage, and then we reward them for their time and engagement.

It’s our view that consumers, who by some estimates are subjected to more than 5,000 ads per day, are keenly aware they are being marketed to. Why not let them choose what interests them and give them some upside for their engagement? It’s an innovative approach that others, like Hulu, have tried too. And while everyone is entitled to their opinion about disruptive models, most people agree that mobile advertising needs fresh approaches to engage busy consumers, and we believe we are taking a leadership role in moving the industry forward in an innovative way. Fast Company seemed to think our approach had a lot of merit.

But it’s not just Tapjoy and Fast Company that thinks this makes sense. As the results of a recent whitepaper we commissioned with Forrester show, we’re on the right track in figuring out what works in mobile advertising. Forrester’s study found that handing control to the consumer for their in-app advertisements can lead to higher attention levels and relevancy. Not surprisingly, respondents’ top request (68%) of future in-app advertising was they prefer ads that don’t interrupt their use of the app. And 59% of those surveyed said they want to be offered a reward in exchange for interacting with or watching an in-app ad.

Consumers love Tapjoy and the freemium business model because it’s a great way to acquire rewards and premium content without opening their wallets. But even though they love free, these consumers are being mischaracterized and maligned as they are not freeloaders. Smartphones users on Tapjoy’s network spend on average more than $200 per year on in-app payments, with tablet owners spending more than $300 per year. And it’s not a small group: Tapjoy’s monthly reach is around 339 million strong.

There will continue to be new approaches to mobile advertising and we routinely tell our partners to experiment and try different solutions — whether it’s Tapjoy or not. We’re committed to continuing to improve our model and the value we provide to consumers, developers and brands. There is so much more we can do to improve the experience, we’re hard at work on many of them and we’re excited about the huge potential ahead of the industry in 2013.

Most people expect mobile to be a hotbed of innovation. It’s our view that mobile advertising should live up to the challenge, too.

Posted by Peter Dille, CMO, Tapjoy

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